The Learning Renaissance

Learning Without Teachers – The Work of Sugata Mitra

Sugata Mitra with children at a hole-in-the-wall project in Delhi in 2011 Photograph: TED

Sugata Mitra with children at a hole-in-the-wall project in Delhi in 2011 Photograph: TED

Sugata Mitra, an education professor at Newcastle University first shot to prominence when he embedded some computer screens and keyboards into the walls of villages in remote areas of India. Without any instructions or support the young people in the villages taught themselves how to use the machines. They quickly communicated with the world, learning how to find and distribute information and to build social networks of support.

Mitra’s work is significant n showing that the paradigms that traditionally drove education, that it was a one way flow of information from the teacher to the student, is becoming increasingly redundant due to the pervasive nature of technology.

This article from the Guardian shows how he is refining his work: The ‘granny cloud’: the network of volunteers helping poorer children learn | The Guardian

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About educationalist04

Dazed and confused much of the time but convinced we can, as a species, do much better than this if we set our minds to being much more positive and productive towards our fellow humans.

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