The Learning Renaissance

The Relationship Between Mindset and Outcomes in Learning, from Carol Dweck

In Two Minds

two-mindsets-fixed-and-growth-carol-dweckThe psychology of learning is greatly underestimated in the classroom to our peril. Perhaps it is the headlong rush to master content that limits time for planning and reviewing of learning and the lessons learned from the approaches applied. In some respects this is about the need to externalise and divorce the learning outcome from too much emotional investment of the personal. In this way, we can become more objective about assessing our progress in a meaningful and fulfilling way.

The table, based on the work of Carol Dweck, explores the psychological mindset of learners and shows how it can define and influence the effectiveness of functioning and learning outcomes.

The two mindsets perceive various learning or work issues in very different ways, and the perception colours the outcome.

FIXED MINDSET ELEMENT GROWTH MINDSET
Avoid  Challenges Embrace
Give up early  Obstacles Persist
See it as fruitless or worse  Effort See it as the path to mastery
Ignore useful negative feedback  Criticism Learn from criticism
Feel Threatened  Success of Others Find lessons and inspiration
Defines me  Failure Fuels learning
Plateau early and achieve less than full potential  Result Reach even higher levels of achievement

From Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, by Carol Dweck

You can read more here: Carol Dweck on Fixed Mindset vs Growth Mindset | Examined Existence

mindset

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About educationalist04

Dazed and confused much of the time but convinced we can, as a species, do much better than this if we set our minds to being much more positive and productive towards our fellow humans.

2 comments on “The Relationship Between Mindset and Outcomes in Learning, from Carol Dweck

  1. Pingback: The Relationship Between Mindset and Outcomes in Learning, from Carol Dweck | Apprenticeship, Skills & Employability.

  2. Pingback: Growth Mindset Explained | The Learning Renaissance

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