The Learning Renaissance

Teaching is not a Business

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Considering teaching as an art implies not only a different understanding of teaching, but requires considering a different framework of knowledge as well. In the arts there are clearly ways of knowing and doing that cannot be represented within the measurable, objective domains of traditional science and education. The musician’s refined sensitivity to nuances of tone, the actor’s to voice and gesture, the clown’s to the possibilities of improvisation, all represent dynamic forms of knowledge and expression which inherently resist fixation and standardization. The highly emergent qualities of artistry do not lend themselves easily to scientific research or discourse and thus do not reflect that type of knowledge which most educational theory has propagated as essential. At the same time such forms of knowledge incontrovertibly evidence precise ways of knowing and acting. Inherent in the concept of teaching as an art is the view that those capabilities and skills which excellent teaching demands are far closer to those required of artists, than of scientists.

Discover ten more things teaching is in this recent post by John DSouza: Teaching is not a Business | LinkedIn

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About educationalist04

Dazed and confused much of the time but convinced we can, as a species, do much better than this if we set our minds to being much more positive and productive towards our fellow humans.

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This entry was posted on March 14, 2016 by in Features and tagged , , , , .

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