The Learning Renaissance

Sir Ken Robinson – a man who refused to see human potential wasted and had faith in the creativity of us all

Sir Ken Robinson at TED2010, Credit: TED / James Duncan Davidson

I’ve been shocked to hear of the death of the staunchest advocate of creativity and human potential that is Sir Ken Robinson. I tend to be iconoclastic – show me the hero and I will find his faults, but in Sir Ken Robinson I saw a titan of learning and thinking.

I first came across him, as did many others in his masterclass TED talk and the subsequent TED Animated Talks in association with the RSA, of which I was a Fellow.

The joy and excitement of his proposition, that we are wasting human with the industrial and managerial model of education that we have adopted certainly chimed with me. The clarity of his messages brought me to write my own contributions, Future Proof Your School and Re-Examining Success, both of which responded to the challenges he posed to make learning more organic and reflective – a goal in itself and not part of a process to churn out homogenous workers.

There is no better tribute to his work than his TED talks which shine a clear light on his genius for making the complicated ridiculously simple!

We shall miss you Sir Ken and thank you for your contribution to a more positive and creative future.

Two of his best talks…

Do Schools Kill Creativity?

Changing Educational Paradigms

 

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About educationalist04

I'm convinced we can, as a species, do much better than this if we set our minds to being much more positive and productive towards our fellow humans. The solution is learning - creating independent and autonomous learners who can problem solve, innovate and create a better more equitable and sustainable world. My books, Future Proof Your School and Re-Examining Success together with this blog, explore how better learning outcomes for all can be achieved.

One comment on “Sir Ken Robinson – a man who refused to see human potential wasted and had faith in the creativity of us all

  1. Pingback: Sir Ken Robinson – a man who refused to see human potential wasted and had faith in the creativity of us all | The Learning Renaissance |

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