The Learning Renaissance

The Science Behind Brain Breaks | Edutopia

Research shows that breaks can provide more than rest. Use them to boost creativity, cognitive function, and social skills. Read more here: The Science Behind Brain Breaks | Edutopia   … Continue reading

June 17, 2020 · Leave a comment

Chartered College of Teachers report on the impact of Covid 19

I found this report from the Chartered College of Teachers a useful read on supporting students through Covid19: Education in the time of crisis: The potential implications of school closures … Continue reading

May 15, 2020 · Leave a comment

FAO: Headteachers/Principals: Call for informal research partner schools from secondary schools in the UK and internationally to evaluate the impact of Coronavirus on learning development in your school

I’m looking to do some research to explore the transformative impact of the Coronavirus on learning in secondary schools… or not. It forms the next element to my books on … Continue reading

May 1, 2020 · Leave a comment

School-based teacher-led educational research: how to get started

I’ve often been surprised at how reluctant senior leaders are in schools to engage in a little academic research to improve the provision in their schools and address the ‘in-house’ … Continue reading

March 16, 2020 · Leave a comment

A Neuroscience Game-Changer: Connectivity Issues and Learning Difficulties

  I’ve spoken before about the disconnect between neuroscience research, with its complexity and nuance, and practical guidance for educators. A new report on the source of learning difficulties has … Continue reading

March 11, 2020 · Leave a comment

Bad local transport linked to failing schools | BBC News

There is a striking overlap between places in England with slow public transport and places with struggling secondary schools, say researchers at SchoolDash. Instead of only looking at education data, … Continue reading

March 5, 2020 · Leave a comment

How Nature Supports Children’s Learning

Perhaps the disconnect between nature and young people has revealed something that we all intrinsically know: that young people learn and thrive in nature. According to a world-first review by … Continue reading

February 26, 2020 · Leave a comment

Re-examining Success: Resetting School Culture for Continuous, Quality-Assured Improvement in Learning

Just over a month to go before Re-examining Success is published. It follows on from last year’s book entitled Future Proof Your School, and continues the theme of change management … Continue reading

January 3, 2020 · Leave a comment

Good grades and a desk ‘key for university hopes’ | BBC News

Having a desk to work at, good grades and high expectations from parents, as well as being happy at school, are key factors in encouraging children to go on to … Continue reading

November 19, 2019 · Leave a comment

Teacher Workload: A crisis which can only be solved with new thinking

There has always been a crisis over teacher workload in British schools. When I began my teaching career it was related to marking. The assumption that you would keep on … Continue reading

November 4, 2019 · Leave a comment

Mothers with ‘controlling voice’ fail to persuade teenagers | BBC News

Mothers who talk to their teenage children in a “controlling tone of voice” are more likely to start an argument than get a positive response, according to researchers. The Cardiff … Continue reading

September 29, 2019 · Leave a comment

Child Development Stages – Charlotte Davies | Fit-2-Learn

Thank you to Charlotte Davies, a Director of Fit-2-Learn, who shared this useful infographic on child development. It outlines and integrates the various stages children need to go through in their … Continue reading

September 2, 2019 · 1 Comment

Burnout Isn’t Inevitable | Edutopia

Teachers are stressed – but schools can help. Lead author Keith Herman, a psychology professor, and his University of Missouri colleagues found that “the high stress levels reported by nearly … Continue reading

June 12, 2019 · Leave a comment

Careers lessons push up GCSE grades | BBC News

Teenagers taught about the world of work are more motivated to get higher GCSE results, say researchers. A careers charity study found pupils who heard directly from employers about the … Continue reading

May 18, 2019 · Leave a comment

Women Who Watched ‘The X-Files’ Pursued More Careers in STEM | www.fastcompany.com

The phenomenon has been known as “The Scully Effect”–named after Gillian Anderson’s character Dana Scully – and the Geena Davis Institute proved it’s real. Women who watched The X-Files regularly … Continue reading

June 13, 2018 · Leave a comment

Hotter years ‘mean lower exam results’ | BBC News

Students taking exams in a summer heat wave might have always complained that they were hampered by the sweltering weather. But this study, from academics at Harvard, the University of … Continue reading

June 3, 2018 · Leave a comment

The Adolescent Brain

A great video from Thomas Armstrong about the developmental processes going on in the adolescent brain…      

May 25, 2018 · Leave a comment

Gesundheit! The Surprising Case of Emotional Contagion | Six Seconds

Humans are highly sensitive to emotional signals in the environment. People tend to catch others’ emotions – an effect known as emotional contagion. And to be able to navigate this … Continue reading

May 23, 2018 · Leave a comment

The Myth of the Grammar School…

The claimed benefits are shown to be down to social factors and cherry-picking, says Professor Stephen Gorard, of Durham’s School of Education: Grammar schools do not have better pupil attainment … Continue reading

April 25, 2018 · 1 Comment

Narrow vocabulary hits pupils grades | BBC News

Research suggests four out of 10 pupils in their first year of secondary have limited vocabulary. Monosyllabic adolescents may be nothing new, but the latest research suggests a big chunk … Continue reading

April 22, 2018 · 1 Comment

The Education System: Crusher of Childhood Genius!

What many of us have suspected about the standardised, managerial industrial model of education has been confirmed by a longitudinal NASA study on creativity in children. Effectively the demand for … Continue reading

April 4, 2018 · 1 Comment

New Metaphors for How the Brain Works

A very interesting article on the latest brain research, from aeon: Your brain does not process information, retrieve knowledge or store memories. In short: your brain is not a computer. … Continue reading

January 8, 2018 · Leave a comment

The Relevance and Impact of Homework on Learning and Pupil Progress

The relevance and impact of homework on learning and pupil progress continues to be a source of controversy amongst pupils, parents, senior leaders and governors. Andrew Jones reports that the … Continue reading

November 1, 2017 · 1 Comment

Exam revision students ‘should smell rosemary for memory’ | BBC News

With the exam season approaching and revision under way, university researchers have suggested that the smell of rosemary could enhance memory. A study found that pupils working in a room … Continue reading

May 10, 2017 · Leave a comment

Who lost the most marks when cheating was stopped? | BBC News

When Romania stopped cheating in its exams, it revealed the scale of the social gap in its school system. But research into an ostensibly successful anti-corruption campaign in Romania has … Continue reading

April 12, 2017 · Leave a comment

Juggling and Lesson Disruption as Motivational Tools

The Educational Endowment Foundation recently published some research about the positive benefits of breaking up science lessons with an unrelated physical activity as an aid to improving learning retention. The … Continue reading

April 3, 2017 · Leave a comment

Music ‘could face extinction’ in secondary schools | BBC News

Music “could face extinction” as a subject in secondary schools in England, researchers have warned. They say music is being squeezed because of pressure on pupils to take subjects included … Continue reading

March 14, 2017 · 1 Comment

Contributors