The Learning Renaissance

Empathy Is The Most Important Leadership Skill According To Research | Forbes #EmpathyDay

You always knew demonstrating empathy is positive for people, but new research demonstrates its importance for everything from innovation to retention. Leaders don’t have to be experts in mental health … Continue reading

June 9, 2022 · Leave a comment

Decision-Making: What Happens When We Wait For “Something Better” | EurekAlert!

When we make decisions, we don’t always have all options available to choose from at the same time. Instead, they often come one after another, as for example when we … Continue reading

May 25, 2022 · Leave a comment

Five ways the internet era has changed British English | The Conversation

The dramatic changes in technology over the past 20 or so years, from the internet to the smartphone and digital assistants like Alexa, have made communication more accessible than ever … Continue reading

February 18, 2022 · Leave a comment

The 10 Most Significant Education Studies of 2021 | Edutopia

From reframing our notion of “good” schools to mining the magic of expert teachers, here’s a curated list of must-read research from 2021 from Edutopia. Not surprisingly the main focus … Continue reading

December 22, 2021 · Leave a comment

Why You Make Better First Impressions Than You Think | BBC Worklife

We often cringe after conversations, convinced we made a bad impression. But research says we may be more likeable than we think. You might expect gender differences in the results, … Continue reading

November 29, 2021 · Leave a comment

Why We Remember More by Reading – Especially Print – Than From Audio or Video | The Conversation

There is growing evidence that people tend to think of digital media as entertainment, so they devote less mental effort than when they’re reading a printed book. So what does … Continue reading

August 22, 2021 · Leave a comment

Self-harm warning signs can appear decade earlier | BBC Health

Early warning signs of self-harm can appear in children almost a decade before it starts, say researchers. The team at the University of Cambridge found two distinct groups that were … Continue reading

June 20, 2021 · Leave a comment

Humour and Cognitive Skills: A Systematic Review of Empirical Research in Higher Education | Jonathan Sandling

The aim of this systematic review is to explore the specific cognitive skills that are associated with humour via a review of the empirical research. Three publications did consider how … Continue reading

June 14, 2021 · Leave a comment

Teens, tech and mental health: Oxford study finds no link | BBC News

There remains “little association” between technology use and mental-health problems, a study of more than 430,000 10 to 15-year-olds suggests. The Oxford Internet Institute compared TV viewing, social-media and device … Continue reading

May 5, 2021 · Leave a comment

Parents find all-day Zoom less captivating than they expected | The Guardian

Scrambling for devices and dashing naked from the shower: lockdown 2 has created new hurdles for families – and schools Having every child simultaneously learning online each day has left … Continue reading

January 18, 2021 · Leave a comment

Research-Backed Strategies for Better Classroom Management | Edutopia

When students act out in class, it can be challenging to find positive ways to address their behaviour. Here’s what the research suggests works best. Read more here: Research-Backed Strategies … Continue reading

December 9, 2020 · Leave a comment

Ways to Make Teaching a More Sustainable Profession | Edutopia

Tips for school leaders seeking to foster an environment that supports, engages, and motivates teachers. With each day that I work with teachers, I am more convinced that it is vital … Continue reading

August 19, 2020 · Leave a comment

Coronavirus: Lost school time ‘will hurt economy for 65 years’ | BBC News

The school time lost because of the pandemic could harm the UK economy for the next 65 years, research published by the Royal Society suggests. The study says the disruption … Continue reading

July 27, 2020 · Leave a comment

10 Types of Innovation

Although developed in the context of product innovation in a commercial setting, I found this diagram of interest and thought it might make a useful point of discussion for learning … Continue reading

July 24, 2020 · Leave a comment

Think Tanks in Education: An Update from Ross Morrison McGill

It would be wrong and extremely naive to assume that any group describing itself as a ‘think tank’ is simply a research-based organisation. In some cases, they are the political/educational … Continue reading

July 10, 2020 · Leave a comment

The Science Behind Brain Breaks | Edutopia

Research shows that breaks can provide more than rest. Use them to boost creativity, cognitive function, and social skills. Read more here: The Science Behind Brain Breaks | Edutopia   … Continue reading

June 17, 2020 · Leave a comment

Chartered College of Teachers report on the impact of Covid 19

I found this report from the Chartered College of Teachers a useful read on supporting students through Covid19: Education in the time of crisis: The potential implications of school closures … Continue reading

May 15, 2020 · Leave a comment

FAO: Headteachers/Principals: Call for informal research partner schools from secondary schools in the UK and internationally to evaluate the impact of Coronavirus on learning development in your school

I’m looking to do some research to explore the transformative impact of the Coronavirus on learning in secondary schools… or not. It forms the next element to my books on … Continue reading

May 1, 2020 · Leave a comment

School-based teacher-led educational research: how to get started

I’ve often been surprised at how reluctant senior leaders are in schools to engage in a little academic research to improve the provision in their schools and address the ‘in-house’ … Continue reading

March 16, 2020 · Leave a comment

A Neuroscience Game-Changer: Connectivity Issues and Learning Difficulties

  I’ve spoken before about the disconnect between neuroscience research, with its complexity and nuance, and practical guidance for educators. A new report on the source of learning difficulties has … Continue reading

March 11, 2020 · Leave a comment

Bad local transport linked to failing schools | BBC News

There is a striking overlap between places in England with slow public transport and places with struggling secondary schools, say researchers at SchoolDash. Instead of only looking at education data, … Continue reading

March 5, 2020 · Leave a comment

How Nature Supports Children’s Learning

Perhaps the disconnect between nature and young people has revealed something that we all intrinsically know: that young people learn and thrive in nature. According to a world-first review by … Continue reading

February 26, 2020 · Leave a comment

Re-examining Success: Resetting School Culture for Continuous, Quality-Assured Improvement in Learning

Just over a month to go before Re-examining Success is published. It follows on from last year’s book entitled Future Proof Your School, and continues the theme of change management … Continue reading

January 3, 2020 · Leave a comment

Good grades and a desk ‘key for university hopes’ | BBC News

Having a desk to work at, good grades and high expectations from parents, as well as being happy at school, are key factors in encouraging children to go on to … Continue reading

November 19, 2019 · Leave a comment

Teacher Workload: A crisis which can only be solved with new thinking

There has always been a crisis over teacher workload in British schools. When I began my teaching career it was related to marking. The assumption that you would keep on … Continue reading

November 4, 2019 · Leave a comment

Mothers with ‘controlling voice’ fail to persuade teenagers | BBC News

Mothers who talk to their teenage children in a “controlling tone of voice” are more likely to start an argument than get a positive response, according to researchers. The Cardiff … Continue reading

September 29, 2019 · Leave a comment

Child Development Stages – Charlotte Davies | Fit-2-Learn

Thank you to Charlotte Davies, a Director of Fit-2-Learn, who shared this useful infographic on child development. It outlines and integrates the various stages children need to go through in their … Continue reading

September 2, 2019 · 1 Comment

Burnout Isn’t Inevitable | Edutopia

Teachers are stressed – but schools can help. Lead author Keith Herman, a psychology professor, and his University of Missouri colleagues found that “the high stress levels reported by nearly … Continue reading

June 12, 2019 · Leave a comment

Careers lessons push up GCSE grades | BBC News

Teenagers taught about the world of work are more motivated to get higher GCSE results, say researchers. A careers charity study found pupils who heard directly from employers about the … Continue reading

May 18, 2019 · Leave a comment

Women Who Watched ‘The X-Files’ Pursued More Careers in STEM | www.fastcompany.com

The phenomenon has been known as “The Scully Effect”–named after Gillian Anderson’s character Dana Scully – and the Geena Davis Institute proved it’s real. Women who watched The X-Files regularly … Continue reading

June 13, 2018 · Leave a comment

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